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Sweet oasis
Landscape incorporates European and American gardening styles to create a perfect paradise.

By AMY SIEWERT

April 2010

A small piece of paradise is perched in the middle of Elm Grove on Marjorie Clark Taktonís property. The 5-acre parcel has been in her family for decades and is the location of her childhood home. Takton tore down the original house and built a new home for her extended family to enjoy.

Along with the new home came a landscape redesign, creating a serene place. "My goal was to create a resort-like feel and an ideal setting for entertaining, fundraising events and family gatherings," says Jean Hanson, a landscape architect with Terra Tec Landscaping in Richfield.

For Takton, the existing pond and stream needed to be an intricate part of the redesign. "I love the running water in the yard," Takton says. "The pond is very important to me."

Hansen incorporated traditional European gardens with American style gardens by blending symmetrical, formal and tailored (manicured) sections of the yard with native American plants and ornamental grasses planted in groups.

She considered the diverse mix of environmental conditions when it came to plant choices ó wet and dry soils, full sun, deep shade, bitterly cold winters, spring floods, intense summer heat and a roaming deer population.

The result is a continuous flow of curving terraces, undulating contours and year-round seasonal interest for Takton and her family.


The idyllic beauty of this stream and pond greets visitors as they enter the Takton property.


 


The swimming pool area is an oasis of color, relaxation and recreation for Takton and her guests. The area has a lot of seasonal interest by using a combination of spruce and boxwood (both evergreen), knockout roses, annuals and various daylilies.


 


There are several "secret gardens" scattered throughout the property, special sitting areas for people as they stroll the rolling topography. This is a stream overlook area that includes a Carpinus or Musclewood tree.


 

 


This story ran in the April 2010 issue of: