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M IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD:

BY JEN KENT

Nov. 2017

 

Illustration by STEPHANIE STEINHAUER

As its seemingly endless construction nears completion, the Village of Wauwatosa shines, offering a European-esque dining and shopping destination for all ages. Village Holiday Spirit, a series of promotions and events coinciding with the holiday season, kicks off Nov. 3 and continues into December, so visiting this ever-evolving area is more apropos than ever.
 

See & Do

With the holiday season just weeks away, pop into Soaps & Scents for a plethora of gift options, from luxurious robes and pajamas to specialty candles and bath oils. (My personal favorite is the Thymes candle in goldleaf — a floral-forward scent with hints of jasmine and lily of the valley.) The staffers are friendly and accommodating, ready to steer you in the right direction, and each purchase can be carefully wrapped for easy gift giving. 7600 Harwood Ave., (414) 771-2228, soapsandscentswi.com

If the little ones in your life need gifting, head to The Little Read Book, a full-service book store with a robust children’s selection. The shop also hosts a monthly book club, which usually meets on the second Wednesday of the month. 7603 W. State St., (414) 774-2665, littlereadbook.com

Located just across the street is women’s apparel and accessories boutique Salamander. Expect to find trendy, transitional styles from a variety of brands, including Joules, Desigual and THML Clothing, and a smartly curated selection of eye wear. 7532 W. State St., (414) 259-0970

Much more than a flower and plant shop, The Flower Lady is also a locally owned home décor store, stocking mirrors, frames, table top accessories and more. The shop is hosting its holiday open house Nov. 10-12, so stop in for specials on stocking stuffers, hostess gifts and holiday decorations. 1417 Underwood Ave., (414) 259-0999,  theflowerlady.com
 

Eat & Drink

Begin your day at Anodyne Coffee Roasting Company, a new-to-the-area coffee shop that debuted last June. Order a honeybee latte and, if the weather allows, sip it outside on the charming backyard patio. The café also sells freshly made pastries and cookies from nearby Le R ve Patisserie & Café, so consider indulging in a sweet — or two! — too.  7471 Harwood Ave., (414) 930-0469, anodynecoffee.com

If you still feel the need to satisfy for you sweet tooth, next door from Anodyne is Niemann’s Candies & Ice Cream. The store has been in business for nearly 100 years, and its handmade candies, from butter toffees and peanut brittle to sea-salt caramels and truffles, are decadent bites of heaven. 7475 Harwood Ave., (414) 774-4940, niemannscandies.com

Another newcomer to the village is the Village Cheese Shop, which also opened last summer. Owner and American Cheese Society certified cheese professional Sabina Magyar brings her extensive knowledge of fine cheeses to the shop, which sells not only cheese, but wine and accompaniments, such as cured meats, nuts and jams. Enjoy a cheese board and glass of wine at the in-house bar, or order an artisan sandwich prepared to order (the menu rotates weekly) to go. 1430 Underwood Ave., (414) 488-2099, villagecheesetosa.com

Fine dining in Wauwatosa is synonymous with Ristorante Bartolotta, an Italian-inspired eatery and the Bartolotta brothers’ first restaurant. Executive Chef Juan Urbieta has been with Ristorante for 15 years, and his seasonally inspired, three-course chef’s menu is not to be missed. Dine on Mondays or Tuesdays for half-priced bottles of wine, and look for the restaurant’s holiday-season-only lunch service, which begins later this month. 7616 W. State St.,  (414) 771-7910, bartolottaristorante.com
 

Stats*

Population
47,126
89 percent white
5 percent African-American
3 percent Hispanic
3 percent Asian-American

*Provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, 2015 American Community Survey
 

DID YOU KNOW?

Wauwatosa is named after the Potawatomi word for firefly. The city’s history dates back to 1835, when Charles Hart became the first European-American to settle there.





 

This story ran in the Nov. 2017 issue of: