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Turning a dream into reality

By MARY LOU SANTOVEC

May 22, 2007

Angel Troyer is a self-taught artist who now teaches others.


"Wanting to be an artist when you grow up is like wanting to be a cowboy," says Angel Troyer. But if you wish hard enough, dreams do come true. Troyer is helping to make both her dreams and those of her students a reality.

The self-taught artist works in a variety of mediums including watercolor, acrylics, oils and stained glass. But oils are her favorite, because of their long drying time. "I have all kinds of time to blend those colors," she says. "Itís like working with frosting."

Troyer teaches 50 to 55 students ranging in age from 5 to 87 in her classroom at Bryan Becker Claywerks in Hartland. She would argue that her students teach her more than she teaches them. "Itís a very symbiotic sort of relationship," says Troyer.

Troyer does not feel at a disadvantage in the classroom because she was not professionally trained. "Iím able to see things and help people fix their work," she says. "Iím told Iím a really good teacher."

With a name like Angel Coral Troyer, and having an auto body painter for a father and a pastry artist for a mother, itís not surprising she became an artist. After spending 7 years in real estate to "feed an art habit," friends encouraged her to open her own studio. She began her professional art career painting murals and spent two and a half years on her own before joining Becker.

Troyer has had to juggle more than just her career recently. Her oldest daughter, Samantha was injured in a car accident a week before Christmas. Currently a quadriplegic, Samantha is expected to walk again. But in order for her to come home from the hospital, Troyer had to move her family to a new house in Delafield that was more accessible for her oldest daughter.

Prior to the accident, Troyer was working on turning drawings that her children created into paintings. She hopes to do more of that in the future.

Troyerís work can be seen at Bryan Becker Claywerks or on her Web site at www.angeltroyer.com.