6th Congressional District candidates talk taxes

October 22, 2014

   
In this file photo provided by his campaign is Republican Wisconsin state Sen. Glenn Grothman. In the race for the only open House seat in Wisconsin this year, both 6th Congressional District candidates agree that the federal government needs to work on reducing the national debt. Grothman and Democrat Mark Harris are also in agreement that the government should stop running budget deficits.

SHEBOYGAN In the race for the only open House seat in Wisconsin this year, both 6th Congressional District candidates agree that the federal government needs to work on reducing the national debt.

Democrat Mark Harris and Republican Glenn Grothman are also in agreement that the government should stop running budget deficits. But the candidates have different views on how that should happen, as well as on the handling of spending and taxes.

Sheboygan Press Media (http://shebpr.es/1wiczGt ) reports Harris, the Winnebago County executive, thinks the government should address the nation's $17 trillion debt through saving during economic recoveries. The debt should be gradually paid off, he said.

In this file photo provided by his campaign is Democratic Winnebago County Executive Mark Harris. In the race for the only open House seat in Wisconsin this year, both 6th Congressional District candidates agree that the federal government needs to work on reducing the national debt. Harris and Republican Glenn Grothman are also in agreement that the government should stop running budget deficits.

Grothman, a current state senator, believes the Affordable Health Care Act was a significant cause of the federal deficit. Obama's health care measure caused higher taxes, job losses, slow economic expansion and more federal spending on programs, according to Grothman.

"The longer we ignore the damaging effects of Obamacare, the worse off we will be," he said.

As a former tax lawyer, Grothman thinks Americans are overtaxed and has promised not to raise income taxes for businesses and individuals.

We need to address broken tax policies that encourage companies to invest overseas and not at home," he said.

Harris believes a flat corporate tax of 20 percent would lead to revenue and a competitive advantage over other developed countries. He doesn't rule out tax increases and suggests the maximum taxable wage base for Social Security should be raised to maintain it sustainably.

"You could argue that raising the maximum tax base for Social Security is a tax increase," Harris said. "But sometimes those things are the right thing to do and I think Social Security is an excellent program and it should be protected."

 

Associated Press