Your Place: Discussion continues on GFCIs in garages

McClatchy-Tribune Information Services

I’m still getting a number of emails about the column on ground-fault circuit interrupters in garage construction — the original questioner wanted to know whether the contractor was exceeding code rather than meeting it.

This from Frederick C. Matz::

"Like your original correspondent, I have a new house which was built to code.

"The electrical code requires that all circuits with an outlet, light, or switch on the exterior be protected by a GFCI.

"My front porch light is on a GFCI.

"The garage is considered to be on the exterior because of the dampness and moisture on the floor.

"In my garage, the wall outlet, the ceiling light and the exterior garage lights are on a GFCI.

"The garage door opener and the lightbulb in it, however, are not on a GFCI, because you do not have a ‘full power’ connection to the device.

"The push buttons you use to open the overhead door are low-voltage switches."

From Wayne Linn:

"Any area considered to be dangerous in the event of power outage or, in this case, a tripped GFCI, can be easily protected with a battery-powered emergency light wired to the protected circuit."

"This will give anyone in the area time to find a way out or a reset."

Thanks to you both.

Child safety

Weeks are set aside as a reminder of important things — fire prevention, poison prevention, and the like.

Even though Child Safety Week is past, sent along some things that I thought I’d share.

More than 3.5 million children visit the emergency room each year because parents don’t exercise the care they should.

For example, three in 10 parents with toddlers say they keep medicine on a low shelf or in an unlocked cabinet.

Nearly 90 percent of the 334 fire-related child fatalities in 2013 were due to home fires.

Fourteen percent of parents say they never check their smoke detector batteries.

More than half of homeowners with pools say they are not protected by fences.