Packers move on from Seattle loss with offseason workouts

April 21, 2015

In this Jan. 2014, file photo, Green Bay Packers' Randall Cobb (18) celebrates his touchdown catch with teammate Jordy Nelson during the first half of the NFL football NFC Championship game against the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle. The Packers opened offseason workouts, moving on from their crushing loss to Seattle in the NFC title game to start looking ahead to 2015.

GREEN BAY Mike Daniels has seen the film of the Packers' last game over and over again in the offseason.

A stunning collapse in the NFC title game to Seattle can be hard to forget.

On Monday came time to officially look ahead for Green Bay with the start of offseason workouts at Lambeau Field.

Daniels has watched the Seattle tape. He's hoping to improve by recognizing his mistakes.

"You have to learn from it and seeing how that's the last game of the season, you don't get a chance to go over it and evaluate it as a group. So guys find some time to watch it, break it down and move past it," said Daniels, one of the leaders on the defensive line.

"There's a lot of great learning points from it, just like any other game. So that's the way we have to take it, and the next game is the next week," Daniels said.

It's more like five more months until the start of a new season. The broader point from Daniels and receiver Randall Cobb on Monday was that the team is moving on.

It's understandable, though, why the 28-22 loss might still sting with fans.

           

In this Dec. 2014, file photo, Green Bay Packers defensive end Mike Daniels (76) chases Buffalo Bills' Robert Woods (10) out of bounds during the first half of an NFL football game in Orchard Park, N.Y. The Packers opened offseason workouts, moving on from their crushing loss to Seattle in the NFC title game to start looking ahead to 2015.

Green Bay led 16-0 at halftime, and 19-7 with 10:53 left in the game. The Packers still led by five with 2:09 remaining even after quarterback Russell Wilson's 1-yard touchdown run.

An onside kick slipped through the hands of Green Bay's Brandon Bostick and Seattle regained possession. Plenty of other plays contributed to the meltdown.

Three months into the offseason, the Packers have regrouped following the setback in Seattle. One of the few times that the game has been brought up since then was Monday by reporters asking about the loss.

"We haven't talked about it. Nobody's really bringing it up. We're focusing on handling business this season," Cobb said. "New beginnings, so this is Day 1 in the process."

The offseason program is about brushing up on the playbook, as well as focusing on getting faster, quicker or stronger. The atmosphere in the locker room might be akin to how students catch up with each other on the first day of class after summer break.

Cobb, who played college ball at Kentucky, got some good-natured grief from teammates and former Wisconsin players Scott Tolzien and Jared Abbrederis after the basketball Badgers beat the Wildcats in the Final Four.

"Yeah, I have, and that was the first thing that I heard from everybody, of course. Yeah. I don't really want to talk about that," he joked.

Cobb is back after agreeing to a four-year, $40 million deal last month. The Packers did let some veterans go on defense: cornerback Tramon Williams signed with Cleveland, long-time inside linebackers A.J. Hawk and Brad Jones were cut.

Those positions figure to be focal points of next week's draft, when the Packers will pick 30th in the first round.

General manager Ted Thompson did bring back size and experience on the line by re-signing tackles B.J. Raji and Letroy Guion to one-year deals. Raji returns after missing 2014 following a biceps injury in the preseason.

Guion turned into a key piece on the defense in place of Raji. But his return appeared to be thrown into question after being charged in connection with a traffic stop in Starke, Florida in February. The case was resolved last month, with Guion entering a no contest plea to a drug charge.

As far as Daniels is concerned, it's time to move on with Guion, too.

"He said, 'Hey, I made a mistake. I need to get back to work.' That's respectful. He already owned up to it," Daniels said. "He just made a mistake and we're past that. It's time to get to work and he's been working."

 












 

Associated Press