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PHILADELPHIA — People hospitalized with severe symptoms from the coronavirus are given medicine to bring down the fever and fluids to keep them hydrated, generally by intravenous tube. Some patients are connected to a ventilator: a mechanical device that helps them breathe. Read more

Older adults and those with serious chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and lung disease, are at higher risk of developing serious complications if infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Read more

Children are not immune to COVID-19. They are getting infected with the disease and can spread it, but they do not get as sick as adults. Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a Mayo Clinic pediatric infectious diseases specialist, offers some insight as to why. Read more

Following a cancer diagnosis, patients often ask many questions about their treatment and possible side effects. One area that is often overlooked is sexual health, which experts say is important to talk about to ensure quality of life. Read more

Media coverage of COVID-19 often includes the phrase “flattening the curve.” Dr. Clayton Cowl, chair of Mayo Clinic’s Division of Preventive, Occupational and Aerospace Medicine, says the phrase refers to an attempt to stop a spike in the number of new cases. Read more

The COVID-19 pandemic is creating critical blood shortages in the U.S. “It’s not due to more COVID-19 patients needing blood products. Rather, it’s a lack of donations coming in,” says Dr. Justin Kreuter, transfusion medicine specialist with the Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Center. Read more

With the number of worldwide cases of COVID-19 on the rise, concerns about this new coronavirus are making many people anxious. Despite the severity of the current situation, Dr. Joseph Sirven, a Mayo Clinic neurologist, says you shouldn’t panic. Read more

Men are slightly more likely than women to be diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and African-Americans have a higher risk than people of other races. However, everyone is at risk for developing the disease, especially after 50. Health care providers say that makes screening a vital part of ev… Read more

Some cancer surgeries are being delayed, many stent procedures for clogged arteries have been pushed back and infertility specialists were asked to postpone helping patients get pregnant. Doctors in virtually every field are scrambling to alter care as the new coronavirus spreads. Read more

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The Washington Ozaukee Public Health Department received notification a person residing in Ozaukee County has tested positive for the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). This person sought medical care and was tested as a result of their symptoms. The individual is currently isolated and has follo… Read more

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MADISON, Wis. — New limitations were placed on Wisconsin child care facilities Wednesday as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the state topped 100, and policymakers scrambled to find emergency help for displaced workers and struggling businesses. Read more

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, continues to spread into communities worldwide. Many are worried, as officials and medical experts urge people to take precautions to contain the virus. Dr. Gregory Poland, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases and vaccine specialist, says that the thr… Read more

Cases of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are on the rise among those 20 and under in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Dr. Ana Creo, a Mayo Clinic pediatric endocrinologist, explains what signs and symptoms parents should be aware of. Read more

As the COVID-19 outbreak continues to expand globally, many are asking what may happen to the outbreak as winter turns to spring. Other viral respiratory diseases, such as influenza, are seasonal in that cases decrease in the spring and summer. But unlike the flu, no one knows what to expect… Read more

WEST BEND — The social and economic costs of the opioid crisis are too immense to ignore, Circuit Court Judge Todd Martens said, which is why he decided to be the presiding judge over Washington County’s drug court cases. While it will not completely solve the problem, he said, having an alt… Read more

JACKSON — Almost everyone has either personally suffered from addiction or knows another who has, so one heroin survivor is speaking up about the crippling power of addiction and how a local nonprofit saved her life.After a decade of a traumatic relationship with heroin, it holds no control … Read more

WEST BEND — Almost 50 additional patients can receive opioid-related treatment next year and services will be expanding throughout Washington County, thanks to a state grant. The Human Services Department has been awarded the $293,000 grant through the State Opioid Response (SOR). Read more

WEST BEND — Each agency has its role in addressing methamphetamine, fentanyl, cocaine and other drugs that persist and arguably grow in Washington County, some preventative and others more reactionary. With nonprofits like Elevate working on prevention, law enforcement ideally has fewer inci… Read more

JACKSON — The Washington County Heroin Task Force and Elevate are hosting a roundtable breakfast discussion on tackling the opioid epidemic, with key actors from county agencies. Read more

WAUKESHA — An expanded fight against opioid abuse with an emphasis on women will launch in Waukesha County based on the success of its prescription drug overdose program, which has saved 88 lives since its inception in 2017. Read more

WAUKESHA — A new Waukesha County-sponsored treatment center for chemically dependent men and women and a separate initiative to fight opioid use in the City of Pewaukee were approved Tuesday by the Waukesha County Board of Supervisors. Read more

MUSKEGO - Megan Murphy is a pretty, talkative 23-year-old from Muskego with long permed hair and a sobriety tattoo. Read more

WAUKESHA — If you wrote a novel about Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman’s exploits, no one would believe it. They might believe the gunfight that killed an archbishop at a Mexican airport, but you’d probably lose them when he escaped prison in a laundry cart. And they’d never believe the beginning o… Read more

WAUKESHA — A lot’s been written about “heroin in the suburbs.” Many reports are episodic: This year’s deaths are increasing, authorities have busted a big ring or another promising young person has died. It’s left pressing questions: How did heroin become so prevalent here in Waukesha County… Read more